Very clear and precise. Useful for our reference. Only ic and passport are considered valid documents to prove elibigility as a voter.

http://www.mfa.gov.sg/canberra/FAQsO...tingGE2011.pdf

INFORMATION ON OVERSEAS VOTING


1. As an overseas elector, how would I know the date and time to cast my vote?

The location of your local polling station will be shown on the poll card that is mailed to your latest NRIC address/contact address. At the local polling station, you will be required to take a declaration that you have not voted elsewhere in the same election, before a ballot paper is issued to you.

5. Can my family member who resides in Singapore vote on my behalf?


No, voting must be done by the voter in person. No others can vote on a voter’s behalf.

6. I was registered as an overseas elector to vote at the Singapore High Commission in London earlier this year. However, I am presently staying in Washington DC. I understand that the Singapore Embassy at Washington DC is also designated as an overseas polling station.


Can I vote there?

No, it is too late to change your overseas polling station now. You can only vote at the Singapore High Commission in London, which is the overseas polling station allotted to you. However, if you are back in Singapore during this period, you can cast your vote at your assigned polling station in Singapore. You will be required to take a declaration that you have not voted elsewhere before you will be issued a ballot paper.

Additional Information:


An overseas voter may apply to change their allotted overseas polling station, but this can be done only before the Writ of Election is issued. Application for change of overseas polling station may be made online via the eServices available at the Elections Department website

http://www.elections.gov.sg

7. I will be taking a holiday in Tokyo where there is an overseas polling station. Can I cast my vote at the Singapore Embassy in Tokyo?


You can only vote at an overseas polling station if you are registered as an overseas elector and have been allotted to cast your vote at that overseas polling station. If you are not a registered overseas elector, you will not be allowed to vote at any overseas polling station.
Additional Information:


If you are unable to vote on Polling Day, your name will be struck off from the Registers of Electors after the election. You can apply to have your name restored to the Registers of Electors one month after the election.

8. I am studying (or working) overseas. Do I have to vote? How would I know whether I have to vote?


The date and hours of the polls for overseas voting will be published in the Singapore Government Gazette and will be announced through the Singapore media and the Elections Department website.

A poll letter will be mailed to you at your overseas address stating the date and time of voting at your overseas polling station. An email with the same information will also be sent to you if you had provided us with an email address.


The poll letter will state, amongst other things, the names of your constituency, the overseas polling station allotted to you, as well as the polling date and hours for that overseas polling station.

A poll card informing you of your allotted polling station in Singapore will also be mailed to your latest Singapore contact address registered with Immigration and Checkpoints Authority (ICA). This will allow you to cast your vote if you happen to be back in Singapore on polling day.

2. What must I bring along to the overseas polling station for voting?

You must bring along the poll letter and your NRIC or Passport (or IC issued by Ministry of Defence, Singapore Police Force or Singapore Civil Defence Force if you are a uniformed personnel) to the overseas polling station for verification of your identity by the polling official.
3. If I have misplaced the poll letter, can I still vote at the overseas polling station which I am assigned to?

You can still vote at your assigned overseas polling station by producing your NRIC or passport to the polling official at the overseas polling station, but it may prolong the voting process as the official may need more time to verify your voting eligibility.
4. If I happen to be back in Singapore on Polling Day, can I vote in Singapore?

Yes, a poll card informing you of your allotted polling station in Singapore will also be mailed to your latest Singapore contact address registered with ICA.

Additional Information

The location of your local polling station will be shown on the poll card that is mailed to your latest NRIC address/contact address. At the local polling station, you will be required to take a declaration that you have not voted elsewhere in the same election, before a ballot paper is issued to you.
5. Can my family member who resides in Singapore vote on my behalf?

No, voting must be done by the voter in person. No others can vote on a voter’s behalf.
6. I was registered as an overseas elector to vote at the Singapore High Commission in London earlier this year. However, I am presently staying in Washington DC. I understand that the Singapore Embassy at Washington DC is also designated as an overseas polling station. Can I vote there?

No, it is too late to change your overseas polling station now. You can only vote at the Singapore High Commission in London, which is the overseas polling station allotted to you. However, if you are back in Singapore during this period, you can cast your vote at your assigned polling station in Singapore. You will be required to take a declaration that you have not voted elsewhere before you will be issued a ballot paper.

Additional Information:

An overseas voter may apply to change their allotted overseas polling station, but this can be done only before the Writ of Election is issued. Application for change of overseas polling station may be made online the eServices available at the Elections Department website www.elections.gov.sg
7. I will be taking a holiday in Tokyo where there is an overseas polling. Can I cast my vote at the Singapore Embassy in Tokyo?

You can only vote at an overseas polling station if you are registered as an overseas elector and have been allotted to cast your vote at that overseas polling station. If you are not a registered overseas elector, you will not be allowed to vote at any overseas polling station.

Additional Information:

If you are unable to vote on Polling Day, your name will be struck off from the Registers of Electors after the election. You can apply to have your name restored to the Registers of Electors one month after the election.
8. I am studying (or working) overseas. Do I have to vote? How would I know whether I have to vote?

If you have earlier been registered as an overseas elector, you would have been informed of when, where and how you can cast your vote through the following means:

(a) A poll letter informing you of the date/time of polls and the overseas polling station allotted where you can cast your vote will be mailed to you based on your overseas correspondence address registered
with the Elections Department;

(b) A softcopy of the poll letter will also be emailed to you if you have provided your email address to the Elections Department. If your name is found in the Register of Electors of any constituency but you have not been registered as an overseas elector, you may still vote if your constituency is contested but only at the polling station allotted to you in Singapore, and you can do so if you happen to be back in Singapore on Polling Day with the poll card sent to your Singapore NRIC address.
Additional Information:

Overseas electors can also visit the Elections Department website at http://www.elections.gov.sg for information on the date/time of polling for the respective overseas polling stations. Overseas polling will be carried out at 9 overseas polling stations located at the Singapore Missions in Canberra, Beijing, Hong Kong, London, San Francisco, Shanghai, Tokyo, Washington and New York.
9. How will overseas voting be done? Is it different from how voting is done in Singapore?

The polling procedures at the overseas polling stations will be similar to the procedures at the polling stations in Singapore. The overseas polls are open for 12 hours from 8.00am to 8.00pm at the
local time of the respective cities and may be extended beyond 12 hours if necessary, but overseas polls must close not later than the close of polls in Singapore, ie. 8pm (Singapore time) on Polling Day. (This would mean that polling at those overseas polling stations located in US will have to be held one day ahead of the polls in Singapore).
10. I have just been relocated to London by my company. I am a Singaporean and a qualified elector. Can I vote at the London High Commission, which has been designated as an overseas polling station?

No, only registered overseas electors who had been allotted to vote at the overseas polling station set up at our London High Commission can cast their votes there. As registration of overseas electors has closed when the Writ of Election was issued, it is too late to apply for registration now.
11. I have registered myself as an overseas elector to vote at the overseas polling station in Beijing, China. Currently, I am working in Shanghai. Can I choose to vote at the overseas polling station in Shanghai, China?

You have been assigned to vote at the overseas polling station in Beijing, China. This cannot be changed once the election is called, and this means that you are not able to vote at the overseas polling station in Shanghai, China.
12 Where and when are the overseas votes being counted or you don’t count the votes at all?

The sealed ballot boxes of marked ballot papers are brought back to Singapore and locked in the vault of the Supreme Court. The Returning Officer will decide a date for the counting of these overseas votes within 10 days after the counting of the local votes. The overseas votes must be counted and the result of count gazetted.
13 Why is it that there is no postal voting/online voting since I cannot return to Singapore to cast my vote?

The Election Department has considered other means of voting such as Internet voting or postal voting for overseas voters. However, these have fundamental challenges of voter authentication, security of the vote and voting secrecy. For these reasons, we have decided not to adopt such voting methods, but to keep to the current polling station-based voting system for overseas voting.
14. How do I qualify to be registered as an overseas elector?

You are qualified to be registered as an overseas elector if you are currently working or residing outside Singapore and you:

(a) are a Singapore citizen not less than 21 years of age as on 1 January 2011;

(b) have resided in Singapore for a total of 30 days during the 3-year period immediately before 1 January 2011 and

(c) are not disqualified from being an elector under any prevailing law. Besides, you must also have a valid NRIC address or local contact address <sup>2</sup> registered with the Immigration &amp; Checkpoints Authority (ICA) as on 1 January 2011. If you have such an address as on 1 January 2011, your name would have been entered into the register of electors of a constituency where that address is located)

Additional Information:

If your local contact address is registered with ICA after 1 January 2011, your name will be entered into the Registers of Electors only when the Registers are next revised.
15. Can I still register as an overseas elector now?

No, registration of overseas electors has been suspended when the Writ of Election was issued (19 April 2011). You may submit your application for registration as overseas electors when registration is resumed after the election.
Elections Department Singapore 28 April 2011

_________________________________________________

However, if you are a non-voter (i.e. your name was struck off from the Register of Electors because you failed to vote in a previous election), you may apply to Elections Department for your name to be restored to the Register of Electors. 2

The address can be the NRIC address that you still maintain with ICA as on the cut-off date, or in case you have changed your NRIC address to a foreign address, the contact address in Singapore that you have reported to ICA as on the cut-off date
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