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  1. #1
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    Non-Muslims for PAS & Duo axed from S'gor PAS posts

    1. Non-Muslims for PAS
    2. Vocal duo axed from S'gor PAS posts


    http://www.thenutgraph.com/non-muslims-for-pas

    Non-Muslims for PAS
    26 Nov 08 : 9.00AM By Deborah Loh

    AFTER 20 years with the MCA, Hu Pang Chaw switched camps to give his
    allegiance to PAS. The former Kelantan MCA Youth secretary quit the
    Chinese-based party a week before the general election in 1999.

    "I got tired of the MCA's infighting and personal agendas," says Hu. Living
    under PAS rule in Kelantan, he felt that the Islamist party was well
    organised, and its leaders and members friendly and humble.

    "I accept the reality in Malaysia that Malay politics will be dominant. The
    choice between Umno and PAS is obvious. Umno divides people but PAS is more
    sincere about treating people fairly," he tells The Nut Graph.

    Hu, a Christian, also reconciled his position with PAS's Islamic stance.
    "They say that in Islam, there is no racial superiority. And there is no
    mention of setting up an Islamic state in the PAS constitution. I have
    studied the constitution and there is nothing there that is against any
    other religion."

    As the constitution only allows Muslims to become members, Hu decided to set
    up a supporters' club. It was launched a week before the general election in
    March 2004 with 100 members. Hu, the club president, said they now have an
    impressive 18,000 members after four years.
    ____________________________________________

    Hu finds PAS's message of equal treatment for all races under Islam
    more appealing than Umno's ketuanan Melayu
    ____________________________________________

    Clubs are active in Kelantan, Terengganu, Kedah, Perak and Selangor. When
    first launched, most supporters were Chinese Malaysians, but Indian
    Malaysians now comprise 70% of the club after Hindraf's emergence on the
    national scene in late 2007.

    The club has been credited with PAS's victories in the 2008 general
    election, especially the wresting of the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN)
    stronghold of Kedah, where the party now rules the state government. PAS
    also retained Kelantan, and holds 22 of the 82 opposition coalition's seats
    in Parliament.

    Now, the club is on the threshold of being elevated to a dewan, or wing, in
    the main party. The top leadership agreed to this in principle at a November
    2008 party retreat. The matter will be raised at the party muktamar (annual
    congress) around the middle of 2009 for delegates' approval, but PAS deputy
    president Nasharuddin Mat Isa is eager for their acceptance. "I hope for a
    much bigger role for the club than what they are now," he tells The Nut
    Graph.

    Advantageous for PAS

    If the delegates approve it, PAS will be the first Islamic party in the
    world to admit non-Muslims, says the party's unity bureau chairperson Dr
    Mujahid Yusof Rawa.

    "It would be wonderful, in this hostile climate of Islamophobia, for PAS to
    set a good example of inclusiveness," says Mujahid, whose bureau oversees
    the club.

    But public relations aside, the political stakes at national level are
    clear. Opening PAS is strategic for its evolution from being the Islamic
    fundamentalist bogey to a national ruling party.

    "It will be advantageous for PAS. The club has got so much support from
    non-Muslims and they are one reason we did so well in the general election,"
    Nasharuddin says.

    DAP elections strategist Liew Chin Tong, who researched PAS for his honours
    degree thesis in Asian Studies, says the supporters' club was a party
    milestone. This was because of the internal struggle between its moderates
    and hardliners in defining its future and relevance to the electorate.

    "PAS has realised that the way forward is to be inclusive. That's how they
    won big in the 2008 general election.

    "Instead of focusing on the Islamic state issue, they focused on people's
    stomachs. This helped them win in areas where non-Malays were the swing
    voters, such as in seats in south Kedah," says Liew, who is also the Bukit
    Bendera Member of Parliament.

    Liew says the idea of making PAS multiracial dates back to the 1960s, but
    that did not take off until after 1999. The catalyst was the reformasi
    movement following Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim's sacking as deputy prime
    minister and jailing for sodomy. PAS joined the opposition coalition, then
    known as Barisan Alternatif (BA) for the 1999 general election. It was
    forced to moderate its stand on its Islamic goals in order to appear
    palatable to its secular allies, DAP and PKR, then known as Parti KeADILan
    Nasional.

    "Before the reformasi, PAS was on the fringes with 450,000 members. A year
    after Anwar's sacking, they had 800,000 members. Today, they have one
    million," Liew notes.

    Faster than the BN

    PAS is responding to growing interest in multiracial political parties
    faster than BN is able to reinvent its model of racially segregated
    representation under Umno dominance. How this will impact national politics
    will perhaps only be known at the next general election, due at the latest
    in 2013.

    How PAS treads the middle path will also be closely watched. The party has
    always had tensions between those seeking to gather mass appeal for PAS
    beyond the Muslim electorate, and those who adhere to "purer" Islamic ideals
    for the whole country.

    In 2002 and 2003, the party was divided over definitions of what constituted
    an Islamic state. According to Liew's research, there was also a policy
    split between conservatives who wanted an Islamic state at federal level,
    and mainstreamers who favoured syariah law only in PAS-governed states
    (Kelantan and then Terengganu). This fracture left PAS unprepared for the
    2004 general election, in which the party performed disastrously, barely
    retaining Kelantan by a whisker.

    Will the admission of non-Muslims drive a deeper wedge between the moderates
    and conservatives?

    Party leaders seem able to justify it, at least to themselves. Mujahid, the
    unity bureau head, said PAS's Islamic ideologies are viable in a multiracial
    context. "PAS will actually become more Islamic with a non-Muslim wing,
    because Islam is multicultural," he says.
    ____________________________________________

    PAS spiritual leader Datuk Nik Abdul Aziz Nik Mat tossing yee sang
    with Chinese Malaysian community leaders in Kelantan in February 2008
    http://www.thenutgraph.com/user_uplo...ub_YeeSang.jpg
    ____________________________________________

    Balancing act

    While admitting non-Muslim members can seem as simple as changing the party
    constitution with a stroke of the pen, there's more to the fine print.

    Hu has big hopes for the non-Muslim wing. He wants to propose that they be
    given three seats on the PAS central committee. "We must have
    representation, or we might as well remain a club."

    Mujahid, who is tasked with studying the technicalities involved in setting
    up the wing, has a cautious response. "We still have a lot to discuss. There
    are issues whether non-Muslims will be given full or associate membership,
    and whether there will be any conditions regarding their eligibility to vote
    and to have representation."

    Nasharuddin also acknowledges the sensitivities involved. "If they become
    members, they shouldn't be treated as second-class. But we are not sure how
    the traditional PAS members will receive them, so we are getting feedback."

    The crux is whether PAS sees itself as a party for all Malaysians. Liew
    believes the party can handle this balancing act, even with its Islamic
    stance, by being inclusive while ensuring that it stays "clean, competent
    and friendly" - aspects that the rural grassroots value.
    ____________________________________________

    Liew believes PAS can balance its Islamic stance and multiracialism
    ____________________________________________

    Can PAS become a centrist, multiracial party, yet uphold its Islamic ideals?
    What bearing will a multiracial Islamist PAS have on its opposition
    partners, the DAP and PKR, which both espouse multiracial secularism? And
    how would it impact on the BN?

    PAS's promise to be fair to all races must be matched with deeds, and it
    must avoid the Umno pitfall of equating race with religion. It waits to be
    seen, but if PAS can pull it off and get the support, serious changes may
    well happen to Malaysia's race-based political landscape.
    ____

    http://www.malaysiakini.com/news/93674

    Vocal duo axed from S'gor PAS posts
    Jimadie Shah Othman | Nov 25, 08 10:26am [extracts]

    Selangor PAS chief Dr Hasan Ali has removed two senior party leaders from
    their posts following their criticism of his handling of religious and race
    issues, which was said to have ruffled his feathers.
    [...]

    The vocal Khalid and Saari were said to have irked Hasan by commenting on
    his views on the appointment of a Chinese acting general manager, Low Siew
    Moi, to head the Selangor Development Corporation; as well as on the state
    allocation of RM10 million for places of worship.

    Malaysiakini understands that the duo were of the view that racial matters
    involving non-Malays should not be the state party's top concern and that
    its leaders should not play up such issues.

    However, this apparently ran contrary to the approach adopted by Hasan, who
    is also Selangor executive councillor. He had reportedly opposed Low's
    appointment on the basis that she is a not a Malay.

    This had elicited mixed reactions from different quarters, with some saying
    that the stance was not in line with the 'PAS for all' campaign adopted
    prior to the 2008 general election.
    py

  2. #2
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    Re: Non-Muslims for PAS & Duo axed from S'gor PAS posts

    Ha ha....PAS still have old stubborn racial habits.
    Bad when its leaders are unable to shake it off.
    Worse when they start shutting out criticism.
    Some more "They say that in Islam, there is no racial superiority"
    I wonder if it is true?



  3. #3
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    Re: Non-Muslims for PAS & Duo axed from S'gor PAS posts

    Quote Originally Posted by racheljansz
    Ha ha....PAS still have old stubborn racial habits.
    Bad when its leaders are unable to shake it off.
    Worse when they start shutting out criticism.
    Some more "They say that in Islam, there is no racial superiority"
    I wonder if it is true?
    Rachel, don't get excited. We have to differentiate individual ambitions from Party principles. Rats are always driven by greed. Just because a Rat wears a turban doesn't make it any different.
    py

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    I sabotaged the boss, says Khalid

    See how the MSM spins the news. The headline is I sabotaged the boss, says Khalid but if you read the article carefully, what Khalid Samad did was to preserve the integrity of PAS by sticking with their PR partners. And this is what Islam is supposed to teach - maintain the truth and integrity. The problem is not with PAS. The problem is with an individual's greed. We shouldn't mix that with the party.

    http://www.mmail.com.my/I_sabotaged_...ys_Khalid.aspx

    I sabotaged the boss, says Khalid

    By Zainal Epi November 27, 2008

    Shah Alam MP Khalid Abdul Samad has claimed that he had sabotaged plans by Selangor Pas commissioner Datuk Dr Hassan Ali to form a possible joint government with Barisan Nasional after the March 8 general election results were announced.

    "I sabotaged his plans. The fact is we won in other States with the help of other parties in Pakatan Rakyat. Why should we form a State government with BN?" he told Malay Mail yesterday.

    BN had won 20 State seats in Selangor, and former Menteri Besar Datuk Seri Dr Mohd Khir Toyo had mooted the idea of an alliance with Pas, which won eight seats.

    Dr Hassan accepted Mohd Khir's invitation for a discussion, but the talks failed. Pas then stayed with Parti Keadilan Rakyat, which won 20 15 seats, and DAP, which secured two 12 seats in Selangor.

    While Khalid, who is the older brother of Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Minister Datuk Seri Shahrir Abdul Samad, got his way in thwarting a BN-Pas coalition, he himself has been ejected from the State Pas line-up announced by Dr Hassan last Friday.

    Khalid, who was the party's State deputy commissioner, said the differences in opinions and approaches between him and his boss had reached a non-reconciliation stage.

    "He wanted team players in the committee and I cannot be a team player with him as the boss. So, he dropped me and chose his men. Now, I will wait and see if he delivers or not," Khalid said.

    "It's either he stays or I stay in the State committee. There is no way we can reconcile and sit in the same committee anymore."

    The bad blood between the two has been a long-standing issue way before March 8 with Dr Hassan wanting more seats for Pas so that the party could play a more prominent role in the State if the opposition alliance were to win.

    However, Khalid felt that Pas should just help strengthen the Pakatan Rakyat alliance in Selangor and take the lead in the other States.

    "Put it this way...I am closer to the Pakatan Rakyat government while Dr Hassan is inward looking. He does not want to play second fiddle in the State government while I am willing because in Pas-held States, other parties in Pakatan Rakyat are playing second fiddle. This is what Pakatan
    Rakyat is supposed to be," he said.

    The split between the two does not stop there. The relationship between the Pakatan Rakyat-led State government and Selangor Pas is also strained.

    Dr Hassan has disagreed on several policies implemented by Menteri Besar Tan Sri Abdul Khalid Ibrahim that he deemed were not beneficial to the Malays in the State but his arguments have been ignored.

    This had led to him shying away from several State exco meetings recently.

    Some Pas members believe that Dr Hassan might continue to stay away from the State exco meetings and this would affect relationships as well as the position of Parti Keadilan Rakyat as the backbone of the State government.

    Khalid is a close associate of PKR adviser Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim, while Dr Hassan was moulded by former Selangor Menteri Besar Tan Sri Muhammad Muhd Taib.
    py

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    .and then there was Khalid Samad

    An unsung hero.

    http://harismibrahim.wordpress.com/2...-khalid-samad/

    .and then there was Khalid Samad
    Posted by Haris Ibrahim November 28, 2008

    I had the honour and the privilege of joining Yang Berkhidmat Khalid Samad as a speaker at two public forums this year.

    I do not really know this PAS man but on both occasions, I was left with the sense that this was a man who was sincere about wanting to bring about a positive change in our country.

    Don't get me wrong.

    I'm sure that along the way, differences of opinion on a lot of issues will crop up and will have to be ironed out, but it will help if all parties will keep a level head and an open mind and take note that this is a nation with a very diverse population.

    YB Khalid strikes me as being such a person.

    Soon after he won the Shah Alam seat in Parliament after the last election, YB Khalid addressed churchgoers in Shah Alam. Watch the video below of his speech at the church.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpwAA...layer_embedded

    Encouraging!

    And in the Malay Mail yesterday, YB Khalid, who had recently been sidelined in PAS Selangor led by Dr Hassan Ali, disclosed that this was because he had, in the days immediately after the last elections, thwarted Dr Hassan's efforts to to form a BN-PAS state government in Selangor.
    http://www.mmail.com.my/I_sabotaged_...ys_Khalid.aspx

    We owe YB Khalid a big 'thank you' for keeping the Selangor state government BN-free.

    I've heard rumours that MBSA had recently approved a move to ban the sale of alcohol in Shah Alam. Don't know how accurate this is, but if anyone who lives in Shah Alam is concerned about this, maybe you should make the effort to see your MP.

    Shah Alam, I think you have a good man in Parliament.
    py

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    A struggle for the soul of Pas

    http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/index.php/malaysia/13406-a-struggle-for-the-soul-of-pas-

    A struggle for the soul of Pas
    By Shannon Teoh

    Nov 28 - The tug-of-war between the conservative ulama faction which controls the leadership of Pas, and the more moderate Erdogan group, has once again spilled out into the open.

    The recent upheavals in Pas Selangor, when moderates Hulu Kelang state assemblyman Saari Sungip and the church-visiting Shah Alam MP Khalid Abdul Samad were removed from the state committee, has led to talk of an ongoing purge of Erdogan faction members by the ulama group.

    The Erdogan moniker is in reference to Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim's close relationship with the Turkish leader Reccip Tayip Erdogan, and signifies their support for Anwar.

    This group is backed by Pas spiritual leader Datuk Nik Aziz Nik Mat, and appears to be supported by a majority of party members.

    The conservative ulama faction, on the other hand, represents the views of its president Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang, deputy president Nasharuddin Mat Isa and a majority of the leadership, who want to distance themselves from Anwar's ambitions.

    What happened in Selangor suggests it is but the first of many skirmishes heading up to next July's muktamar, or party general assembly, where party elections will be held.

    The sudden move by Pas Selangor to apply pressure on the state government toban alcohol sales is also a reflection of the infighting which is happening now in the party.

    While PKR, widely accepted as the main agenda-setters of the opposition Pakatan Rakyat (PR) alliance, holds its annual congress this weekend, the problem of Pas weighs heavily and may usurp proceedings.

    PKR and to a greater extent DAP, have sat uneasily as time and again, Pas has displayed its ability to rattle the coalition. From Bumiputera issues to the stunning exposure of Umno-Pas talks, non-Muslims have been given ample reason not to shed its mistrust of the Islamic party.

    But for the moderate Erdogan group, led by vice president Datuk Husam Musa and secretary-general Datuk Kamaruddin Jaafar, winning the hearts of the non-Muslims is the desired end, and the means is by winning over their own Malay Muslim grassroots first.

    Politically and theologically, they believe that for the party to achieve national acceptance, its grassroots must believe in being inclusive rather than play the divisive zero-sum game of "exterminating enemies of our race and religion."

    A prominent moderate, Pas research chief Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad has taken it upon himself to go to the ground to spread the "gospel" of Prophet Muhammad's role as arbitrator in Medina.

    According to Islamic tradition, despite being in the minority Muslim community there, the Prophet had become the arbitrator and resolved longstanding grievances between the various tribes in Medina, and even drafted the Constitution of Medina.

    "Instead of forcing Islam down their throats, why not communicate Islam?" is his message, as he travels with slideshows of how non-Muslim votes are necessary to beat the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition.

    The problem in the past has been that for non-Muslims, Pas has been "unelectable" due to fear of Islamisation. While March 8 proved non-Muslims are willing to vote for a more moderate Pas, inconsistencies in how the party conducts itself only breeds contempt and doubts over its sincerity.

    The Erdogan group is now fighting back against what they see as regressive steps.

    Championing of Bumiputera rights, for example, is seen as an area which is not considered a priority by the moderates. It is an Islamic, not a Malay party, they contend.

    As it stands, party members can generally agree on one thing - that Umno is the enemy, the embodiment of all that must be purged from the "Muslimin and Muslimat." So why copy its racial chauvinism?

    Instead, the Erdogan group is backing a more humble approach.

    Khalid, when asked on his ejection from the Selangor committee, was gracious in conceding that state chief Datuk Dr Hassan Ali should be allowed to work with a team he was most comfortable with.

    "We are not here to displace them. We are happy to play second fiddle. We cannot deny that the base is the conservative northern and eastern Malay belt, but we are here to add value," a leading Erdogan member told The Malaysian Insider.

    "I believe the hardliners are all sincere without any sinister motive. They are well-meaning," Dzulkelfy had told The Malaysian Insider recently.

    The Erdogan group will likely grit its teeth from now until next year's muktamar and persevere even if its rank and file continue to be "persecuted." What it believes must be done, is for it not to be seen as a threat but as a vital element in establishing Pas as a national party.

    The catch-22 for the hardline ulama group is while it fears the party will be taken over by the moderates, it also needs these personalities.

    But if the Erdogan group is not backed by the grassroots in the party elections, it may very well be curtains for Pakatan Rakyat.

    "In the next six months or so, leading up to the muktamar, we need to consolidate and work on coalition building with our PR partners. If we cannot do this by then, we can just forget it, as the coalition will then fall back to the fragmentation of the 2004 general elections," an Erdon group memberr concluded, referring to the heavy defeat the opposition suffered in 2004.
    py

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    Re: Non-Muslims for PAS & Duo axed from S'gor PAS posts

    We have to be careful about news media labels like moderates, conservatives, hardliners, etc

    They are just clothes that we put on a person to compartmentalize him.

    Treat each person as an individual and consider him from that perspective. We will get a clearer picture that way.


    http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/news/st...85189,00.html?

    Mr Moderate VS Mr Conservative
    Will internal strife cause split in PAS?

    November 30, 2008

    A TUG-OF-WAR happening within PAS is threatening to strain relations between
    those in its party and with other affiliated parties in the Pakatan Rakyat
    (PR) alliance.

    PAS SPIRITUAL LEADER: Datuk Nik Aziz Nik Mat
    http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/mnt/med...GES_PAS29t.jpg

    Within PAS, or Parti Islam SeMalaysia, clashes are now evident between the
    conservative ulama faction which controls the leadership of PAS, and the
    more moderate group, reported liberal news portal The Malaysian Insider.

    A recent upheaval in PAS Selangor, when moderates like state assemblyman
    Saari Sungip of Hulu Kelang and Shah Alam MP Khalid Abdul Samad were removed
    from the state committee, has led to talk of an ongoing purge of the
    moderate faction members by the more conservative ulama group.

    The more moderate group is backed by PAS spiritual leader Datuk Nik Aziz Nik
    Mat, and appears to be supported by a majority of party members.

    The conservative ulama faction, on the other hand, represents the views of
    its president Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang, deputy president Nasharuddin Mat
    Isa and a majority of the leadership, who want to distance themselves from
    Mr Anwar's ambitions.

    What happened in Selangor suggests it is but the first of many skirmishes
    heading up to next July's party general assembly, where party elections will
    be held, said Malaysian Insider.

    The sudden move by PAS Selangor to apply pressure on the state government to
    ban alcohol sales is also a reflection of the infighting which is happening
    now in the party.

    According to Sin Chew Jit Poh, the heart of the conflict lies with one
    person, the Selangor PAS chairman Hassan Ali.

    Mr Hassan Ali belongs to the conservative camp of PAS, who has over the
    years strongly advocated theocracy as well as Malay rights.

    ULAMAFACTION LEADER: Datuk Abdul Hadi Awang
    http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/mnt/med...PAS29-YILt.jpg

    Such a discourse is vastly different from PAS' effort, especially by
    reformists like Mr Nik Aziz, to try to shed its racist image.

    The conservative stance has rattled the nerves of coalition partners PKR and
    to a greater extent DAP.

    For the moderate group, winning the hearts of the non-Muslims is the desired
    end and the means is by winning over their own Malay Muslim grassroots
    first, the news portal said.

    The problem in the past has been that for non-Muslims, PAS has been
    'unelectable' due to fear of Islamisation. While 8 Mar proved non-Muslims
    are willing to vote for a more moderate PAS, inconsistencies in how the
    party conducts itself only breeds contempt and doubts over its sincerity.

    The moderates are now fighting back against what they see as regressive
    steps.

    Championing of Bumiputera rights, for example, is seen as an area which is
    not considered a priority by the moderates. It is an Islamic, not a Malay
    party, they contend.

    More humble approach

    Mr Khalid, when asked on his ejection from the Selangor committee, was
    gracious in conceding that state chief Mr Hassan Ali should be allowed to
    work with a team he was most comfortable with.

    'We are not here to displace them. We are happy to play second fiddle. We
    cannot deny that the base is the conservative northern and eastern Malay
    belt, but we are here to add value,' a leading moderate told The Malaysian
    Insider.

    'I believe the hardliners are all sincere without any sinister motive,' said
    PAS research chief Dr Dzulkelfy Ahmad.

    The moderate group will likely grit its teeth from now until next year's
    assembly and persevere even if its rank and file continue to be
    'persecuted'.

    The catch-22 for the hardline ulama group is while it fears the party will
    be taken over by the moderates, it also needs these personalities.
    py

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    Interview of Khalid Samad - PAS can't govern alone

    PAS can't govern alone

    Posted by admin
    Thursday, 04 December 2008 11:56

    So it takes time and I think we are moving in the right direction. And I hope that by the next elections, we should be in a position to give membership to the non-Muslims. That is the objective.


    By Shanon Shah, The Nut Graph

    THERE has been some speculation among political observers that PAS is trying to purge the progressives from the party. One news analysis talked about the axeing of the “Erdogan” faction, referring to the removal of none other than the party's Shah Alam Member of Parliament (MP), Khalid Samad, as deputy commissioner II of Selangor PAS.

    Prior to that, in a 26 Oct issue of Mingguan Malaysia, Parti Keadilan Rakyat (PKR)'s Zulkifli Nordin accused Khalid of being too rigid in his party affiliations. Khalid apparently raised Zulkifli's ire by not supporting his stand on Islam.

    Add to this the fact that Khalid's brother is Umno supreme council member and Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Minister, Datuk Shahrir Abdul Samad, and you have quite an interesting political figure.

    ..http://mt.m2day.org/2008/content/view/15657/84/
    py

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    Part II of Khalid Samad Interview - Understanding Islam

    Understanding Islam

    Posted by admin
    Friday, 05 December 2008 10:52

    I think that in Malaysia, the religious and racial issues has been overemphasised, politicised, and taken advantage of, and this is something we have to learn to handle in a more civilized and educated manner.


    By Shanon Shah, The Nut Graph

    MANY applauded when PAS Member of Parliament (MP) for Shah Alam, Khalid Samad, stepped into the Catholic Church of the Divine Mercy after his 8 March 2008 general election victory.

    In this second and final part of an exclusive interview with The Nut Graph, Khalid responds to the recent fatwas banning tomboys and yoga, and examines what an Islamic state means.

    TNG: On 22 Nov 2008, the National Fatwa Council announced a ban on yoga practice among Muslims. A few weeks prior to that, it announced a ban on tomboys. Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Datuk Seri Zahid Hamidi, the Inspector-General of Police, and even the Jakim director-general have all warned the public, especially non-Muslim Malaysians, not to challenge these fatwas. What are your views on the subject?


    Khalid Samad: I think first and foremost we must understand that fatwas are judgments made based on Islamic sources, on what the scholars understand about a particular issue.

    As far as yoga is concerned, I think ..http://mt.m2day.org/2008/content/view/15694/84/
    py

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