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Thread: BERSIH 3.0: Now that BERSIH is Over, RPK's Perspective

   
   
       
  1. #1
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    BERSIH 3.0: Now that BERSIH is Over, RPK's Perspective

    http://www.malaysia-today.net/mtcolu...is-over-part-1

    Now that BERSIH IS OVER

    http://www.malaysia-today.net/mtcolu...is-over-part-1

    THE CORRIDORS OF POWER



    Wednesday, 02 May 2012 Super Admin




    And what is the will of the people? The people want free, fair and clean elections. Only through a free, fair and clean election will the country see changes. But how do you see a free, fair and clean election if there is no change? And how would you see change if there are no free, fair and clean elections? That is what is called a Catch 22 situation. You need change to see the elections that you want. But you will never see change unless the election system first changes.

    THE CORRIDORS OF POWERRaja Petra Kamarudin

    Now that Bersih 3.0 is over and the euphoria has subsided a bit, maybe we can get back down to ‘normal’ business. But then what would we regard as normal in the context of Malaysia? I suppose there is nothing that can be considered normal when it comes to Malaysia. After all, Malaysia is not a normal country so the definition of normal would not apply here.

    How can Malaysia be regarded as normal when the government shouts One-Malaysia but Malaysia is not one. Malaysia is a country of four classes of people. At the top echelon is the Umnoputra, the ruling elite. Next comes the Rajaputra, the members of Malaysia’s Royal Family that can literally get away with murder. Then we have the Bumiputera or sons-of-the-soil, the race that receives preferential treatment. Finally, at the bottom of the list is what we call the non-Bumiputera, those whose ancestors came from India or China 500 years or so ago and became Malaysian citizens in 1957.

    Yes, some Malaysians are 20 generation citizens but they are still considered ‘immigrants’ while others who are second generation citizens can go on to become the Prime Minister of Malaysia. If that can’t be considered abnormal then I do not know what can.

    Would the word ‘normal’, therefore, apply to Malaysia? Malaysia is a secular nation with Parliamentary elections and a Constitutional Monarchy. Absolutism was abolished when the Straits Settlements, Federated Malay States and Unfederated Malay States were abolished and merged into the Federation of Malaya when independence or Merdeka was granted by the British in 1957. Yet you can get punished under Malaysia’s Sedition Act if you criticise the Crown just like during the time of Henry VIII or Elizabeth I hundreds of years ago in England when the Monarch was ‘appointed by God’ and absolutism ruled the realm.

    Malaysia is certainly a contradiction of the highest degree. And only in secular Malaysia can God’s law be imposed on Muslims and punishment meted out for crimes against God like just like during the time of Henry VIII or Elizabeth I hundreds of years ago in England when the Monarch was appointed by God and absolutism ruled the realm.

    Hence, what is normal? Normal is what the ruling elite says is normal. And one man’s meat is another man’s poison.
    Malaysians are faced with a Catch 22 situation. And if you do not understand what Catch 22 means then go look it up. We need to see major reforms in Malaysia. Malaysia is still living in the past. As the ex-Prime Minister Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi said, Malaysia is a country with first-world infrastructure but third-world mentality.

    This is actually very true. If you were to read the comments in Malaysia Today made by so-called ‘progressive’ Malaysians you can see that these are comments by people with a third-world mentality. Right can be wrong and wrong can be right as long as it suits their agenda. They would readily apply the rule of the ends justifying the means when it is in their favour and oppose this concept when it works against them. The Malays call this ‘matlamat menghalalkan cara’.

    Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak understands and appreciates this. After all, he is very westernised in his thinking, as is his entire family. But understanding and appreciating it is one thing. Whether he can do anything about the matter is another thing altogether.

    Yes, Najib knows what needs to be done. And he realises that if he does not do what needs to be done then Umno and Barisan Nasional are at the end of their days. But he is not at liberty to do the right thing. And he is not at liberty because he is not really the Prime Minister. He is merely a de facto Prime Minister. But then was this not the dilemma faced by many leaders over the last 200 years since the late 1700s who had to allow circumstances to dictate what they do and paid a heavy price for resisting the will of the people?

    And what is the will of the people? The people want free, fair and clean elections. Only through a free, fair and clean election will the country see changes. But how do you see a free, fair and clean election if there is no change? And how would you see change if there are no free, fair and clean elections? That is what is called a Catch 22 situation. You need change to see the elections that you want. But you will never see change unless the election system first changes.

    It is almost like a chicken and the egg situation. Which comes first, the chicken or the egg? Which comes first, changes or free, fair and clean elections? Without changes there will not be any free, fair and clean elections and without free, fair and clean elections there will never be change.

    And this is not the dilemma facing just Malaysians but also Najib’s dilemma as well. Najib is not stupid. After all, he studied in England. He knows the history of the Congress of Vienna of 1815. The Congress of Vienna was a move to defend the rule of absolutism and to deny the people democracy and self-rule. But that same Congress accelerated the downfall of absolutism and triggered the revolutions of the 1840s and the creation of republics all over Europe during the second half of the 1800s.

    Those who ignore history are doomed to repeat its mistakes. Najib knows this. But can you change the course of history? They thought they could, 200 years ago in Europe. But history has shown us that you can’t. Ultimately, the people’s will decides the course of history. And, today, Malaysia is where Europe was 200 years ago.

    And that is how I see Bersih 1.0, Bersih 2.0 and Bersih 3.0 last weekend. I will stop here for now while you digest what I have just said. But I am certainly far from finished. So stay tuned where I will take you through the second and maybe third parts of this analysis. In Oxford they only allow you 1,000 words for your essay and my essay has already exceeded this word limit by almost 50 words.
    py

  2. #2
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    http://www.malaysia-today.net/mtcolu...is-over-part-2

    Part 2


    THE CORRIDORS OF POWER

    Wednesday, 02 May 2012 Super Admin



    According to what Najib’s people are claiming, Abdullah Badawi received almost RM500 million in ‘donations’ to approve this project, a project that so many countries such as China rejected. Even the Latin American and African countries rejected this project. No one wanted it. But Malaysia agreed to accept it for the RM500 million in donation that was paid.


    THE CORRIDORS OF POWERRaja Petra Kamarudin


    Any turn-around manager will tell you that to turn around an organisation in dire straits or an organisation in distress you must attack the top three problems plaguing that organisation. In most cases the top three problems result in 80% or 90% of an organisation’s problems. And the remaining problems can sometimes solve themselves once the top three are resolved.


    So what are the top three problems facing Umno and Barisan Nasional? These can change from time-to-time. However, if Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak were to hold the 13th General Election today, I would say that the top three problems facing Umno and Barisan Nasional are Bersih, Lynas and the NFC. If Najib can resolve these three issue then he can dissolve Parliament this month and hold the general elections within 30 days of that.


    Lynas is actually a more serious problem than many people realise. And I am not talking about the ecological or potential health problem but the political fallout to Umno and Barisan Barisan. Lynas is a project in Najib’s home state of Pahang. Pahang, like Johor, has always been regarded as Umno’s fortress (Kubu Umno, as the Malays would say). But because of the Lynas project, that is about to change. Pahang may no longer be that fortress that it used to be. And this is worrying Najib like hell.
    Najib can easily solve this problem by killing the Lynas project. That would, of course, be in theory. Just kill Lynas and the problem would go away. But they can’t do that. And they can’t do that for many reasons. Hence Najib is caught between rock and a hard place. He knows that Lynas is bad news but he can’t do anything about it.


    Actually, Lynas is not Najib’s project. It is Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi’s project. And what Najib can’t seem to understand is why was Lynas given this licence to print money? And if Najib wants to close down Lynas to make the problem go away then he would be opening a whole can of worms that can actually work against Umno and Barisan Nasional rather than save them.


    According to what Najib’s people are claiming, Abdullah Badawi received almost RM500 million in ‘donations’ to approve this project, a project that so many countries such as China rejected. Even the Latin American and African countries rejected this project. No one wanted it. But Malaysia agreed to accept it for the RM500 million in donation that was paid.


    RM500 million sounds like a lot of money. But RM500 million is actually pittance if you consider that the company is expected to make RM1 billion a year and has been given a tax holiday of 12 years. That would mean RM12 billion tax-free profits for a mere RM500 million in kickback.


    If Najib wants to kill the project he can always get Umno to refund the RM500 million that was paid. Surely RM500 million is not that big a sum for Umno, which can easily get its hands on billions of Ringgit. Okay, the project has been completed at a cost of RM1.2 billion and is ready to run. So the government must also compensate Lynas for the RM1.2 billion it already spent.


    That comes to only RM1.7 billion in total, not too great a sum to make sure that Pahang does not fall to the opposition. And if Pahang falls to the opposition, like Penang did in 2008, then just like what happened to Abdullah Badawi, Najib too would be ousted from office.


    But this is not just about the RM1.7 billion. What about the ‘loss of profits’ amounting to another RM12 billion over 12 years? Can the government also compensate Lynas that RM12 billion loss of profits as well? That is something that the government can ill afford.


    Furthermore, this is not only about the money. The Royal Family is also involved. And how much would the government have to pay the Royal Family as compensation as well? How many billions would they also want?


    Sure, kill the project and the problem would go away. It only needs money to achieve that. But the money we are talking about may finally come to RM20 billion or RM30 billion. And Malaysia does not have RM20 billion or RM30 billion to pay out as compensation to kill the project.


    What will happen if Pakatan Rakyat takes over the federal government and Anwar Ibrahim becomes the new Prime Minister? Can Anwar do what Najib cannot do? Can Anwar or the Pakatan Rakyat government kill Lynas? Will Malaysia have RM20 billion or RM30 billion to pay as compensation to kill the project?


    Najib inherited this project just like Anwar will if he takes over as Prime Minister. And Anwar’s hands will be tied just like how Najib’s is. The cost to kill this project will be extremely expensive for the country. And whether Najib stays on as Prime Minister or Anwar takes over, it will still be a costly exercise to kill the project.


    How the hell did Malaysia approve a project that so many other countries refused to take? And why give them a 12-year tax holiday on top of that when they are going to be making RM1 billion a year? They don’t need any tax breaks! Instead, Malaysia should whack them for as much tax as we can. And, most importantly, did the RM500 million really go to Umno or did it go into the pockets of certain Unmo people?


    According to Najib’s people, Umno did not receive the money. They said that the money went into Abdullah Badawi’s pocket. So how can Umno refund money it did not receive?


    Would Abdullah Badawi dare do something like this? Okay, maybe he knew he was at the end of his term and that he was about to get kicked out. Nevertheless, Lynas is a very high profile issue and surely you can’t keep a high profile issue such as Lynas below the radar screen.


    It seems Lynas is not the only disaster created by Abdullah Badawi that Najib had to inherit. The NFC project is yet another. This is another disaster that was left by Abdullah Badawi and which Najib has now inherited. And it seems Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad is pissed big time about this.


    When the NFC proposal was first mooted, Deputy Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin rejected it. Khairy Jamaluddin then pushed it to the Ministry of Finance and got his father-in-law to approve it. After it was approved by the Minister of Finance cum Prime Minister, the project was pushed back to the Ministry of Agriculture. And now it is Najib’s problem, an inheritance left by Abdullah Badawi.


    Yes, how does Najib solve the Lynas and the NFC matters? He can’t. And the voters do not care that both these disasters were Abdullah Badawi’s doing and that Najib merely inherited the problems. As far as the voters are concerned, both Lynas and the NFC are Umno’s and Barisan Nasional’s doing. And the voters are going to punish the ruling party in the coming general election, never mind which Prime Minister is guilty of these crimes.


    Again, I will stop here for the meantime and will continue in part three the other issues that are preventing Najib from calling for the general election in June as he had originally planned. So stay tuned as I take you through my series called Now that Bersih is over.
    py

  3. #3
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    Part 3

    http://www.malaysia-today.net/mtcolu...is-over-part-3

    No doubt Najib also can’t antagonise MCA, MIC and Gerakan. If he were to take away some seats from MCA, MIC and Gerakan and give them to PPP then this would make Umno’s lead partners very unhappy. However, if giving these seats to MCA, MIC and Gerakan would only mean that the seats would be lost to Pakatan Rakyat, Najib may have very little choice in the matter.


    THE CORRIDORS OF POWERRaja Petra Kamarudin


    Barisan Nasional is no longer the Barisan Nasional that was first mooted by Tun Razak Hussein soon after the May 13 incident of 1969. Barisan Nasional is basically Umno plus about eight political parties from East Malaysia. While the eight political parties from East Malaysia can be entrusted with the task of keeping Sabah and Sarawak within the ruling coalition, the same can’t be said for the four non-Umno parties from West Malaysia.


    Umno is fighting a lone battle to hold on to Sememanjung Malaysia without much help from the others. Hence does Umno need MCA, MIC, Gerakan and PPP? In terms of votes the answer would, of course, be ‘no’. But Umno knows that it cannot fight a lone battle against PKR, DAP and PAS. It needs more parties and MCA, MIC, Gerakan and PPP are currently not it.


    MCA is a Chinese party while MIC is Indian. Gekaran and PPP can be considered multi-racial parties. However, just like PKR is a Malay-based multi-racial party and DAP a Chinese-based multi-racial party, so is Gerakan -- a Chinese-based multi-racial party. As much as they try, Gerakan, just like DAP, can’t seem to shed its Chinese image. Hence this only leaves PPP, which is seen as an Indian-based multi-racial party.
    PPP was formed by the Seenivasagam brothers in 1953 as an opposition party to the then Alliance Party. Its first president was Dr Kanagaratnam Pillai. The Seenivasagam brothers were in fact very popular because they spoke up for justice, equality and the rights of the common man.


    In 1969, PPP almost formed the Perak State Government. However, two of its State Assemblymen crossed over, like what happened to Pakatan Rakyat soon after the 2008 general election. In 1973, PPP joined Barisan Nasional and in 1974 it lost all the seats it had won in 1969.


    Since then, PPP was nothing but a mosquito party. In every election it had to beg for seats and what it received instead were insults from Umno leaders such as Ali Rustam who publicly, during a PPP convention in Melaka, told PPP to fuck off. PPP knew that if it wanted to regain its lost glory of the 1970s, it would have to cease playing the role of a beggar and reinvent itself to become credible again.


    PPP realises that the future lies with a multi-racial party and that the days of Malay, Chinese or Indian parties is long gone, although in East Malaysia parochial politics still rules the day. And that is what PPP has been quietly doing in the background over the last few years.


    Six years ago, PPP actually proposed a merger with Gerakan, the only other multi-racial party in Barisan Nasional. But Gerakan never thought it was about to lose Penang so, of course, it rejected the idea. Gerakan probably now feels it should have seriously considered the proposal, whether that would have changed anything.


    Since then -- the rejection by Gerakan and the insult by Ali Rustam -- PPP has been gaining ground. It now has about 500,000 members -- 48% Indians, 32% Chinese, 13% Malays, and the rest of other ethnicities. They are now well poised to make a comeback if they are given any seats to contest the coming election.


    Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak has given up on MCA, MIC and Gerakan. However, as I said, Najib also knows that Umno can’t face the elections in West Malaysia alone. So he needs to build up a new multi-racial party that not only can attract the Indians and Chinese but the Malays as well. And Najib is putting his money on PPP.


    Of course, MCA, MIC and Gerakan are not going to allow this to happen without a fight. If PPP were to be given any seats it would have to be seats from MCA, MIC and Gerakan. Certainly PPP would not be given any Umno seats. So expect MCA, MIC and Gerakan to protest any move to give PPP seats to contest the coming election.


    But Najib cannot ignore PPP either. Every event that PPP organises the crowd is impressive. MCA, MIC and Gerakan can no longer attract any crowds. PPP, however, appears able to do that. And this has not gone unnoticed.


    No doubt Najib also can’t antagonise MCA, MIC and Gerakan. If he were to take away some seats from MCA, MIC and Gerakan and give them to PPP then this would make Umno’s lead partners very unhappy. However, if giving these seats to MCA, MIC and Gerakan would only mean that the seats would be lost to Pakatan Rakyat, Najib may have very little choice in the matter.


    But then the decision may not be entirely Najib’s. It seems Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad has begun to be impressed by PPP’s ability to increase its membership and attract crowds at its functions. And Dr Mahathir would like to try out PPP this coming election and see how it fares.


    And is not Najib beholden to the ex-Prime Minister? And if Tun Dr Mahathir wants to give PPP a chance to prove itself, who is Najib to say otherwise? We may be seeing some very interesting developments come the next election. And if what I think is going to happen does happen, then PPP may become Umno’s first wife while MCA, MIC and Gerakan may be reduced to concubines.


    Anyway, I will stop here and continue tomorrow. Three articles in a day are quite taxing on my old grey cells. In part four I may talk about the real story, the untold story behind Bersih 3.0. So stay tuned for more.
    py

  4. #4
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    Part 4 http://www.malaysia-today.net/mtcolu...is-over-part-4

    We need to ask: why are there laws that allow such drastic action against unarmed and defenceless Malaysians? Why can something so brutal become legal? Well, that is because our most honourable Yang Berhormat Ahli Parlimen who we voted for and sent to Parliament passed these laws in Parliament. They passed laws that made it legal for the police officers or soldiers to shoot or brutalise Malaysian citizens.


    THE CORRIDORS OF POWERRaja Petra Kamarudin


    Some readers are lamenting that I am rehashing and repeating what I have already said before. It appears they are tired of reading ‘the same old thing’. Well, the Russians said the world has a memory of only 100 days -- in response to their no response regarding the Koran Airlines KAL 007 disaster. Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said: Melayu mudah lupa (the Malays forget so easily). Actually, most Malaysians mudah lupa, not just the Malays


    I suppose those of you with long memories do not like reading about the same issue again and again. Maybe you think that once is enough and the message will sink in clearly enough. We do not need to keep repeating ourselves.


    In that case, why did we need to organise anti-ISA rallies every year for 50 years? Is not just one anti-ISA rally good enough? After all, the message is the same each time. There is no new message in all those many rallies. It is the same old message. So, why repeat our message by organising one rally after another for 50 long years?


    Apparently, once is not enough. Even 50 years of anti-ISA demonstrations have not done the trick. Even now, after 52 years, the ISA has not gone away. It has merely been reincarnated in another life form.


    And why do we need Bersih one, two and three -- and probably four, five six, and so on, after this? Is not just one Bersih rally sufficient? Why the need to keep repeating ourselves? I am sure the government understood our message in Bersih 1.0 back in November 2007. Maybe they did not listen, but they certainly heard us in Bersih 1.0. Hence, is not Bersih 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, etc., redundant? If the government did not listen during Bersih 1.0, do you think they are going to listen even if we have Bersih 10.0?


    The bottom line is: people never listen. So we need to keep harping on the same issue and drum it into their heads again and again. We have to keep chipping away at the Berlin Wall, metaphorically speaking, until finally ‘the wall’ comes crashing down. It did take 39 years for the Berlin Wall to finally come tumbling down. And it took 27 years for Nelson Mandela to sit in jail before his message finally got through and Apartheid also came tumbling down like the Berlin Wall.


    One indication that people never listen is the manner that many respond to what is being written. While the subject may be about, say, the manner in how the local council workers are killing stray dogs, instead of discussing the issue of cruelty to animals, many focus on debating the colour of the dog collar. This appears to be the tendency of many readers, not only in Malaysia Today but in the other Blogs, websites and news portals as well.


    I have also, again and again, said that we need to discuss the cause and not the result. The result is due to the cause. We cannot change the result. We need to attack the cause. For example, corruption, abuse of power, mismanagement of the country’s resources, racism, persecution, intolerance, police brutality, manipulation of the judiciary, and many more ills that face Malaysia, are the result.


    We cannot change the result if we do not eliminate the cause. Hence, screaming and foaming at the mouth regarding the result is not going to help. We need to understand what causes all this and work towards changing that. The result will change once the causes have been eliminated.


    Also understand one more thing: we cannot keep doing the same thing and expect different results. If we keep doing the same thing we will keep getting the same result. That is another thing that many can’t seem to comprehend. Hence I need to keep repeating all these issues until people start understanding the issue. At the moment, we are very far from achieving this.


    Let us take the issue of police highhandedness and brutality as an example to what I am trying to say. This is the issue that many are debating in the aftermath of Bersih 3.0 last Saturday. Was the action by the police during the Bersih 3.0 rally really brutal? That is what many of you are debating. And the reply to that question would be ‘yes’.


    Okay, while most of your focus on talking about the police highhandedness and brutality during last Saturday’s Bersih 3.0 rally, I do not waste my time in engaging on that subject. And the reason is: because we will get nowhere talking about that. What, then, would I talk about? I would talk about this.


    Police highhandedness and brutality has been the ‘norm’ since back when I was a teenager in the 1960s. I personally have been subjected to police highhandedness and brutality even as far back as 50 years ago. But it still goes on in spite of whatever we may say. Hence, will screaming about it change anything unless we change the reason why such things happen? As I said, we need to attack the cause. If the cause remains, the situation will never change. And no amount of screaming is going to help.


    Do you know that when the ‘Reformasi 6’ were in Kamunting back in 2001 -- and that was 11 years ago -- they were beaten up? Do you know that a few of us were beaten up in front of the Dang Wangi Police Station back in 2001 and I was beaten up inside the police station? Do you know that since 1998 demonstrators were beaten up every time they took to the streets? Do you know that in the 1970s defenceless ISA detainees behind the barbed wire fences of Kamunting were shot with tear gas and then beaten up when they launched a hunger strike as a mark of protest? They were not demonstrating or marching on the streets. They were locked up in Kamunting. Yet they were brutalised.
    So that is the issue. The issue is why are the police able to brutalise defenceless citizens and get away with it? And how can we stop all this from happening?


    You see: the police personnel are protected by the law, mainly because they are enforcing the law, and we, the citizens of Malaysia, get no protection, mainly because we are breaking the law. It is as simple as that. For example, if emergency were to be declared and a curfew is imposed and the army is summoned to enforce martial law, then the soldiers have every right under the law to shoot us dead even if we were just walking to the shop next door to buy some bread.


    Is it right to shoot someone who was just going out to buy some bread? Of course not! But the law allows it. Once emergency is declared and martial law is imposed, the soldiers have every legal right to shoot first and ask questions later. And they did this in Kampung Baru in May 1969. Many Malays from outside Kampung Baru who had gone there, and were stranded because of the curfew and had no place to go, were shot dead by the Sarawak Rangers. And there was nothing illegal about this.


    We need to ask: why are there laws that allow such drastic action against unarmed and defenceless Malaysians? Why can something so brutal become legal? Well, that is because our most honourable Yang Berhormat Ahli Parlimen who we voted for and sent to Parliament passed these laws in Parliament. They passed laws that made it legal for the police officers or soldiers to shoot or brutalise Malaysian citizens.


    Hence, while you channel your anger at the police (or soldiers, as the case may be), I am not going to bother to whack the police. Would I want to get angry at the fox that ate the chicken? Is not the natural instinct of the fox to eat chickens? Is it not the nature of the beast? I want to know how did the fox manage to get into the chicken run in the first place. We cannot stop the fox from eating chickens. It is what they do. But we certainly could have protected the chickens. So that is where the fault lies.


    I have been arrested, detained, put in prison, etc., enough times to know that there are good policemen and prison warders and there are bad policemen and prison warders -- just like there are good politicians and there are bad politicians.


    I have had policemen sneaking cigarettes into my cell and stand guard while I take a smoke. And it is their cigarettes, mind you. I did not have to pay for it. And note that cigarettes are contraband and you will get punished for smoking in prison.


    I have had prison warders sneaking bottled mineral water into my cell because they know I would never drink the piss water that they serve us in prison. Some have smuggled cakes, roti canai, and all forms of foodstuff to me because they know I would not feed my dog the food they give us let alone eat it myself. One warder even phoned Anwar Ibrahim and became my ‘courier’ to send and receive messages to and from the outside.


    One warder was a PKR committee member in Perak. Two younger chaps were PAS members who joined the demonstrations in Kedah and who picked up the tear gas canisters and threw them back at the riot police. Another one shouted ‘reformasi’ and gave me the clenched first salute whenever he passed my cell. He would also pass me cigarettes through the prison bars. Another chap opened my cell door and took me out for a walk when the coast was clear. Another removed my blindfold so that I could ‘see some sky’ (we are constantly blindfolded and handcuffed whenever we are brought out from our cell).


    All these are crimes and these people would have been in deep shit if they had been caught. But they were with the cause and they treated me as a comrade rather than a prisoner.


    As I said, there are good police officers and prison warders and there are bad police officers and prison warders. Some have treated me like dirt. Some have taken risks that would have cost them their jobs had they been caught. So let us not curse all police officers and prison warders. Curse the bad ones by all means. However, more importantly, curse the Members of Parliament who passed laws in Parliament that allow Malaysian citizens to be brutalised on the excuse that the law was being upheld.


    That would be talking about the brutal manner that the dog was killed rather than the colour of the dog collar.
    py

  5. #5
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    Part 5:
    http://www.malaysia-today.net/mtcolu...is-over-part-5

    What is so wrong with stepping onto the green grass of Dataran Merdeka? What is the harm in doing that? If the Bersih 3.0 demonstrators can assemble on the streets surrounding Dataran Merdeka, if that is not an issue, why is stepping foot on Dataran Merdeka such a serious crime that warrants the use of force, even to the extent of getting a court order to make the use of force even more legitimate and legal?

    THE CORRIDORS OF POWERRaja Petra Kamarudin

    Don’t get mad, get even, said Lee Iacocca’s wife. This was in response to Lee Iacocca brooding around the house and getting his blood pressure up after he got sacked from the leading US motor company, Ford. Sure, Lee Iacocca was mad. He was the number two in Ford and was the man who made Ford the number one motor company in the US, or at least the man who made sure that Ford retained the number one slot.

    Taking his wife’s advice, he went out and got a job with Chrysler, a company on the brink of bankruptcy. Armed with a loan from Congress, he turned around the company and dislodged Ford from the number one position. Congress never thought it was going to see its money back. He not only paid back the loan, he paid it back ahead of time on top of that. And he made sure that Chrysler gave Ford a licking it would never forget.

    Many of you are mad about what you consider police highhandedness and excessive use of force last Saturday during the Bersih 3.0 rally. I, on the other hand, am not mad. Well, I used to be mad. I used to be mad 14 years ago back in 1998 when we first experienced such brutality. But I am now beyond mad. I am already at the level of getting even. My mad streak has been spent and I now just want to get even.

    I am beyond mad because I have accepted that this is how we are treated if we oppose the government. If we go against Umno and/or Barisan Nasional, this is what they will do to us. Hence I take it as an occupational hazard. This comes with the territory. If we oppose the government they will brutalise us. That is what happens in Malaysia.

    But sometimes we do need to get mad. We need to get downright angry. We need to get pissed big time. If we do not then we will never act. And inaction will just make things worse. So we need to act if we want to see changes. The question is: what or whom do we get mad at and what action must we take to get even?

    That is where we need to focus our energy or else it will be energy wasted.

    Do we get mad with the tools? The tools are merely the instruments of someone. Why get mad with the tools? It is the one abusing those tools that we need to get mad with. And in this situation, the police force is merely the tool of that higher power, the powers-that-be, those who walk in the corridors of power.

    We must remember that two very senior police officers have now joined the ranks of the opposition -- Ramli Yusuff and Mat Zain Ibrahim. Then there are those six police officers still in service that signed Statutory Declarations exposing the previous IGP, Musa Hassan, and revealed his links with the underworld crime syndicate. And for this these people have paid a heavy price that very few other Malaysians like you and me are prepared to pay.

    Some have been charged for all sorts of imaginary crimes as retaliation for exposing the wrongdoing in the police force. Some have been transferred and their careers gone bust. Some are in cold storage and have no future in the police force any longer.

    Furthermore, I personally have Deep Throats in the police force that are feeding me information about transgressions and wrongdoings of those in power. Without these people we would never know what is going on and would not be able to run all these untold stories.

    Yes, we are mad. We are mad about what they did last Saturday. But do we want to curse all police officers and call them ‘pigs’ and ‘dogs’ when some of these police officers oppose the very same thing that we too oppose?

    As I said, the police force is merely a tool of oppression. Even Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad spoke out against this matter when he called Malaysia a police state. Dr Mahathir was referring to Umno rather than the police force when he said that Malaysia is a police state -- although it was the police force that was irritating Dr Mahathir.

    Of course, this was all because, this time around, Dr Mahathir was on the receiving end of such oppression when for 22 years as Prime Minister he was the oppressor. Receiving is not as much fun as giving, as Dr Mahathir discovered, unless it is money you are receiving, of course.

    So who are the real oppressors if the police force is merely a tool of oppression? The police force has no power. Even the top police officer, the IGP, cannot detain you without trial. The Detention Order needs to be signed by the Minister of Home Affairs, the man whom the police take orders from.

    So, if you are detained without trial and locked away for eight years, whom should we get mad with? The police force? The prisons department? Or the Minister who signed our Detention Order, the only man with the power to do so?

    Let’s go back to last Saturday. If the Minister or the Prime Minister had called up the IGP and told him that there must be absolutely no brutality on that day, would the police have dared defy that order? If the Minister or the Prime Minister had called up the IGP and instructed him that all the barricades are to be removed and that the Bersih 3.0 rally were not to be obstructed in any way, would we have seen what we saw happen last Saturday?

    But this was not the case. Instead, what happened last Saturday was that the Minister and/or the Prime Minister told the IGP that Dataran Merdeka is to be cordoned off and barricades are to be set up and if anyone were to cross the ‘police line’ then the police are to respond with the use of force.

    Taking this into consideration, the police personnel were told to just observe. However, the instant someone crosses the barricade, then the police are to respond with the use of force. At all costs no one is supposed to set foot on the green grass of the padang on Dataran Merdeka. There are no two ways about it.

    What is so wrong with stepping onto the green grass of Dataran Merdeka? What is the harm in doing that? If the Bersih 3.0 demonstrators can assemble on the streets surrounding Dataran Merdeka, if that is not an issue, why is stepping foot on Dataran Merdeka such a serious crime that warrants the use of force, even to the extent of getting a court order to make the use of force even more legitimate and legal?

    Well, only the Minister and the Prime Minister can reply to that question. The lower ranking police personnel would not know the answer to that question. They were just told to stand by and wait for the order to shoot. And once the order was given, they are to shoot without any further delay and break heads if necessary to stop anyone who tries to cross the line and step foot on the green grass of Dataran Merdeka.

    The answer to that question is actually very simple. Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak was scared shit. He was scared shit that Saturday, 28th April 2012, was the day he would be forced to step down. And with so much baggage that he is carrying, he just cannot afford to be ousted from office. Being ousted from office may also mean he might be sent to jail.

    But why was Najib so scared shit of 28th April 2012? On 28th April 2012 it was supposed to be a Bersih rally, just like the two Bersih rallies before this. Bersih 1.0 and 2.0 came and went without him having to step down. Why should he worry that Bersih 3.0 is not like Bersih 1.0 and 2.0 and that this time around he is going to be ousted from office?

    Well, you see, the reports that he had received were that Bersih 3.0 is not going to be like Bersih 1.0 and Bersih 2.0. This time around they are going to launch a Malaysian Spring. And the Malaysian Spring is going to be triggered by the move to occupy Dataran Merdeka. Dataran Merdeka is going to be ‘captured’ and the demonstrators are going to use that as the base for the Malaysian Spring that is going to see Najib kicked out of office.

    Hence Najib was scared shit that some people were planning to jump over the barricades and launch the ‘Occupy Dataran’, which in turn will trigger the ‘Malaysian Spring’. If that happens then Najib will have to run away or else end up in jail. And Najib was not prepared to run away or go to jail. Hence no one must step foot on the green grass of Dataran Merdeka padang at any cost.

    Was there a plan to occupy Dataran Merdeka? Was there a plan to launch the Malaysian Spring? Was there a plan to make sure that Saturday, 28th April 2012, would be the day that Najib is ousted from office? Or was this just Najib’s imagination or the result of bad intelligence and wrong feedback from Bukit Aman and the Military Intelligence?

    So, yes, Saturday, 28th April 1012, was a brutal event. But I do not want to talk about that because demonstrations have always met with a brutal response from the government. What I want to know is why did the police suddenly turn brutal, after agreeing to look and see, just because some bright spark decided to jump over the barricades?

    And, most important of all, who gave the order to be brutal and at all costs prevent those thousands of Malaysians from setting foot on the green grass of Dataran Merdeka?

    That is whom we must be mad with.
    py

  6. #6
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    Part 6

    Now that Bersih is over (part 6)

    THE CORRIDORS OF POWER

    Friday, 04 May 2012 Super Admin



    http://www.malaysia-today.net/mtcolu...is-over-part-6

    If you have been warned and if you come prepared for combat, well and good. But if you thought this was going to be a Saturday afternoon stroll with your babies, children and grandparents and you were caught totally unprepared, then this is not well and good. You would be what I would call cannon fodder. And that is very irresponsible of those who planned this and did not inform everyone that Saturday, 28th April 2012, was going to be the Malaysian Spring and to achieve that you first need to occupy Dataran Merdeka.

    THE CORRIDORS OF POWERRaja Petra Kamarudin

    No, I have not finished with my series Now that Bersih is over. I am already on page 14 and am probably only halfway to what I want to say. I really don’t know whether this would be regarded as a thesis rather than an essay. Anyway….

    This was what was reported in the Internet today.

    Former Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad says the escalated violence of the most recent Bersih rally was an indication that the opposition is anticipating a major loss in the upcoming General Election, and more demonstrations and more violence can be expected.

    Saying the opposition would resort to anything so that it can to seize power, Dr Mahathir said, “Malaysian elections have been more clean than those in the authoritarian countries where results have always been obviously fixed.”
    (READ MORE HERE)

    In short, what Dr Mahathir is saying, the opposition is choosing pilihan jalan raya as opposed to pilihan raya. (This has been Bersih Committee Member Hishamuddin Rais’ favourite battle cry). Translated into English, that would be: the choice of the streets rather than elections. However, a more apt equivalent would probably be: the bullet rather than the ballot.

    Now, before I talk about the main issue, I would first like to touch on the part where Dr Mahathir compares Malaysian elections to some other countries. Dr Mahathir said, “Malaysian elections have been more clean than those in the authoritarian countries where results have always been obviously fixed.”

    Dr Mahathir is speaking just like many Pakatan Rakyat supporters. Malaysia’s elections may not be the cleanest in the world, but it is still cleaner in comparison to, say, countries like Iraq during the time of Saddam Hussein or Nazi Germany during the time of Adolf Hitler.

    Pakatan Rakyat supporters also use this same argument. The opposition may not be the best and there may still be some corruption amongst the opposition politicians, but the opposition is still better than Umno and Barisan Nasional by comparison.

    I suppose if we can accept this argument by the Pakatan Rakyat supporters then Dr Mahathir’s argument makes sense as well. Remember me telling you to be careful how you argue your case because your argument can be used against you?

    Dr Mahathir is using the same argument that Pakatan Rakyat supporters use. And if this argument works in the defence of Pakatan Rakyat and to justify the weaknesses in the opposition then we have to grudgingly agree that Dr Mahathir has a point and that his argument is valid.

    No, we cannot use the ‘I may not be the best but others are worse’ argument. What if I were to argue this way?
    I may not pray or go to the mosque but at least I don’t take bribes like some so-called pious Muslims who pray and go to the mosque and yet take bribes.

    Does that make me a good Muslim or a better Muslim than those who pray, go to the mosque and take bribes?
    What about the following arguments?

    I may drink but I do not eat pork. I may drink and eat pork but I do so with my own hard-earned money and not using money earned from bribery. I may take bribes but I pay zakat (tithe) on the bribes that I take. I may take bribes but I take only a small amount and not in the hundreds of millions like some people. I may not be a faithful husband but I only occasionally have sex with my maid and not every day like some people. I may have sex with my maid but I pay her each time I have sex with her so it is not like I am taking advantage of her.

    I suppose translated into those situations the arguments do not sound that kosher after all.

    Anyway, back to the issue I really want to talk about. Dr Mahathir is lamenting that the opposition is trying to topple the government. And, according to Dr Mahathir, they are using Bersih to do that.

    Actually, this is not a revelation at all. This statement of Dr Mahathir can’t be regarded as an expose. I think most people already knew that. Many who came out for the Bersih 3.0 rally last Saturday were aware that the rally was not just about clean, fair and free elections but about bringing down the government.

    The fight for clean, fair and free elections has been going on for a long time, long before Bersih 1.0 in November 2007. Yet, in spite of all that effort, Malaysia is going backward rather than forward. Things have been deteriorating rather than improving. Hence I wrote in an article last month: can Bersih actually achieve what it wants to achieve if all they do is march on the streets and chant slogans? (That article met with some very violent responses).
    Abdar Rahman Koya, Latheefa Koya’s brother (Latheefa is a PKR leader and one of Anwar Ibrahim’s lawyers and a member of his inner circle), said in his article published in Harakah entitled ‘In defence of storming the barricades at Dataran’:

    The truth is that we all went there to break the law. A law devoid of fair play and justice, a law which is enforced to the detriment of ordinary citizens. The barricades blocking our march into Dataran Merdeka are the clearest and most tangible symbol of the government’s animosity to the ordinary public. It would be foolish to be there and not dismantle them.

    We did not go there to merely shout and punch the air. We probably did so last year, singing in rain at the gates of Stadium Merdeka. This time, it is serious business. There is no time to waste. We are talking about tens of thousands of dubious names in the electoral roll, new voters whose citizenship are suspicious, the continued Big Brother mentality of our tax-funded television channels, and many more.

    The people of Egypt would not have celebrated the downfalls of their tyrants had they followed the law and stayed outside the perimeters of the heavily fortified Tahrir Square. History shows that for change to happen, removing police barricades is a norm, indeed the act has become a main ingredient of peaceful protests to claim back public places and venues denied to them. It does not justify any high handedness by the security forces.

    The April 28 rally is not a tea party or simply a ‘walk’ as some who participated in it would like to think. Those who feel we should not have stormed the barricades at Dataran might as well stay home clicking at the ‘like’ button of anti-government Facebook pages, or disappear into some obscure stadium as suggested by the Kuala Lumpur mayor, in keeping with the stand that DAP leader Tunku Aziz has taken.

    (READ MORE HERE)

    Anwar Ibrahim himself admitted the same thing during the press conference in the PKR headquarters on Monday morning. This is revealed in the 55th second of the following video.

    SEE VIDEO ON YOUTUBE HERE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UD1ebhoCxD4

    Personally, I have no problems with toppling governments. Since time immemorial governments have been toppled all over the world. Sometimes it is through the ballot box. Sometimes it is through revolutions. Sometimes it is through armed rebellions. Sometimes it is through foreign intervention. Sometimes it is through assassinations.
    Toppling governments is what people do. Even Prophets have propagated the toppling of governments. Even the US topples governments and Malaysia is still very good friends with the US. China tried to topple the Malaysian government through the CPM, but failed, and we are good friends with China.

    Hence, I do not believe that Dr Mahathir or Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak or whoever it may be is sore that the real agenda of Bersih 3.0 was to topple the government. What they are really sore about is that it is the Umno-Barisan Nasional government that they are trying to topple. That is the real issue.

    These people are not opposed to those who tried to topple the Brunei government or are trying to topple the Philippines or Thai governments (at least in the Muslim-majority ‘autonomous’ regions). In fact, Malaysia aids them and gives them support. Toppling governments is not something that Malaysia is concerned about. It is toppling Umno and Barisan Nasional that is the real concern.

    My only concern is not whether it is right or wrong to topple governments. I am an anarchist so toppling governments is what I do. That is my ‘hobby’. My concern is that some or many of those who participated in the Bersih rally were not aware of the real agenda. And that was why they brought along their babies, children, grandparents, etc.

    If the objective last Saturday was to go into physical combat then people should have been warned. People should know what they are getting themselves into and given a choice whether to join the fight or stay away if they can’t stomach the bloodshed.

    The police had been warned. As what the Prime Minister said (READ HERE) and as what Dr Mahathir said (READ ABOVE), the government knew that Bersih 3.0 was an attempt to topple the government. Hence we can expect the police to have been given instructions to break heads.

    If you have been warned and if you come prepared for combat, well and good. But if you thought this was going to be a Saturday afternoon stroll with your babies, children and grandparents and you were caught totally unprepared, then this is not well and good. You would be what I would call cannon fodder. And that is very irresponsible of those who planned this and did not inform everyone that Saturday, 28th April 2012, was going to be the Malaysian Spring and to achieve that you first need to occupy Dataran Merdeka.

    That is my only beef. No one should be tricked into participating in something under false pretences. If they do participate it must be based on the full understanding of what is going to happen. And don’t use Tahrir Square as the parallel. Those who came out on Tahrir Square knew what was going to happen. They knew the agenda and it was no hidden agenda. The agenda was to fight and to bring down the government. It was not a weekend stroll with your family.
    py

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