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Thread: SPR: EC rues 'poor' response from Malaysians abroad

   
   
       
  1. #21
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    Doubts cast over two-week overseas voting period


    By Boo Su-Lyn
    January 27, 2013


    KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 27 ― At least 24 days is required for overseas voting instead of the two weeks proposed by the Election Commission (EC), electoral reform NGO Tindak Malaysia said yesterday.
    With the 13th general election fast approaching, EC deputy chief Datuk Wan Ahmad Wan Omar told ABC Radio Australia last Wednesday that there would be two weeks between the nomination and polling days for ballot papers to be sent overseas, for the casting of votes, and for the tallying of votes back at their respective constituencies in Malaysia on polling day.

    “Two weeks definitely not enough,” Tindak Malaysia representative PY Wong told The Malaysian Insider yesterday.

    “What we need is to challenge the EC. Give us a detailed breakdown for each operation... the important thing is to give overseas voters a proper opportunity to vote, not to have a sandiwara (drama) where you give them postal votes and it doesn’t come back in time,” he added.

    Wan Ahmad told ABC Radio Australia that there will be enough time if the ballot papers arrive back in Kuala Lumpur one week after being sent to Australia, for example.

    “Because within that one week, the final one week, you have time to send these ballot papers to sort out and send these ballot papers, to the respective constituencies, where the returning officer will count the ballot papers what are called after, after pm the closing time of the polling, of the ordinary polling in Malaysia,” he said.

    But Wong pointed out that eight days, starting from nomination day, would be required for ballot papers to be printed, sent to EC’s headquarters in Putrajaya, then to returning officers in each constituency, and back to EC Putrajaya.

    Another 14 days would be needed for the EC in Putrajaya to send ballot papers to various embassies and to have them returned to administrative capital, before subsequently sorting and sending the ballot papers to respective returning officers that would take another two days.

    Below is Wong’s breakdown of the overseas voting process:

    Nomination Day, Day 1: Identify candidates and their sequence on the ballot paper through drawing lots.
    Day 3: Government printer prints ballot papers.
    Day 4: Ballots sent to EC in Putrajaya.
    Day 5: EC in Putrajaya sends postal ballots to EC in each state.
    Day 6: State ECs distribute to ballots the returning officer (RO) for each constituency. RO informs the candidate.
    Day 7: RO and the polling agent for postal voting (PACAPOS) distribute postal ballots and seal in main envelope.
    Day 8: RO dispatches postal ballots to EC in Putrajaya.
    Day 9: EC in Putrajaya sends postal ballots to the Foreign Ministry.
    Day 12: Foreign Ministry delivers postal ballots to various embassies.
    Day 15: Embassy informs postal voters by post or posts to them.
    Day 18: Postal voter returns ballot to the embassy.
    Day 21: Embassy couriers return postal ballots to the Foreign Ministry.
    Day 22: Foreign Ministry sends postal ballots to EC in Putrajaya.
    Day 23: EC in Putrajaya sorts out and sends direct to ROs.
    Day 24: Postal ballots reach the RO.

    Wong said that three days also needed to be set aside for public holidays and possible delays, making it a total of 27 days.
    “The critical ones are those which don’t have embassies or consular offices and those in continent-size countries. Example Brazil, US, Australia, Russia or China,” he said.

    “It appears their procedure is to require a postal voter to fly to the embassy to collect the postal vote and vote immediately and they are given 24 hours notice to do so and have one day to vote. This is quite unusual,” the activist added.

    He stressed that Tindak Malaysia would be “happy for the EC to prove us wrong.”

    “What we want is transparency and confidence that the EC has done their homework to ensure that overseas postal voters can return their ballot in time,” said Wong.

    Wan Ahmad said in the interview that EC in Putrajaya could send the ballot papers to returning officers around the country in a day.

    “We have all the means, we have the plans, we have scheduled programmes relating to this. It’s not a problem,” he said.

    He added that those living in southern Thailand, Singapore, Brunei and Kalimantan were not allowed to be postal voters as they lived close to Malaysia.

    “People like, people in Singapore, for example, they just cross the Causeway and come back, to where they are registered to vote, so are those in Brunei. So most Malaysians who are in Brunei, they are mostly from either from Sarawak or from the state of Sabah, and those who are in Kalimantan, they are mostly Malaysians from Sarawak,” said Wan Ahmad.

    EC chairman Tan Sri Abdul Aziz Mohd Yusof said last Wednesday that to date, the EC has received 125 applications from Malaysians abroad who wished to vote by post in the 13th general election that must be called by April.
    py

  2. #22
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    Only one thing to do. Replace the EC with a truly independent group.
    Residency clause for overseas voters ‘reasonable’, EC insists



    January 27, 2013
    Wan Ahmad said the 30 days need not be accrued consecutively. — File pic

    KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 27 — The condition for overseas voters stipulating that they must have returned to Malaysia in the last five years and stayed not less than 30 days in the country is reasonable, said EC deputy chairman Datuk Wan Ahmad Wan Omar.He said the condition was simple and appropriate and had also been adopted by other Commonwealth countries such as Australia and Canada, while Singapore has set the period at three months.

    “Thirty days in a period of five years, not 30 days consecutively. Voting is not just a right but a responsibility to the country. EC also looks at it as showing love for country and still having a link with the homeland,” he told Bernama after being interviewed on RTM’s “Selamat Pagi Malaysia” talkshow at Wisma TV, Angkasapuri here today.

    Wan Ahmad said the condition was proposed to the Parliamentary Select Committee (PSC) on Electoral Reforms which approved it.

    He said, however, that the decision to set the condition of five years and 30 days was set by the EC, as provided for under the Election Laws and Regulations.

    “As a constitutional organisation, the EC has the authority to set certain conditions and procedures,” he said, dismissing claims by certain quarters that the condition was not discussed at the committee stage at Parliament.

    Earlier, Rasah MP Anthony Loke from the DAP had urged the EC to review the condition, contending that it was unfair and would unnecessarily impede the election process.

    Loke had also claimed that the EC delayed registration of overseas voters for almost 13 months from the date the PSC raised doubts on its preparedness and commitment to ensure a fair and clean election process.

    Wan Ahmad, in reply to this, said thorough preparation was necessary because the EC needed to discuss with the Foreign Ministry and on the election process for outstation voters as it would involve Malaysian embassy staff who would represent the EC.

    Apart from that, he said the co-operation of the Immigration Department was also necessary to check the records on the outstation voters’ return to Malaysia besides having to provide training to the assigned embassy staff.

    The regulation to allow Malaysians abroad to vote through the post was gazetted on January 21 this year based on three conditions, namely that they must have been in Malaysia or returned to the country for 30 days in a period of five years before the dissolution of the current parliament or state legislative assembly, and living abroad excluding those who are living in southern Thailand, Singapore, Brunei and Kalimantan.

    Prior to this, only fulltime overseas students and civil servants and their spouses were allowed to vote through the post as absentee voters.

    Meanwhile, Wan Ahmad said since January 21, the EC had received 500 applications from Malaysians living abroad to become postal voters in the 13th general election.

    He expected the applications to increase with the simplified process of sending back the form to the EC via email.

    “The opportunity for Malaysians to be outstation voters is a political transformation and a paradigm shift in the democratic process,” he opined. — Bernama
    py

  3. #23
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    MyOverseasVote and Global Bersih Call on Overseas Malaysians to Vote in the 13th General Election, and Press the EC to Allow Postal Voting Observers

    Admin:
    Very well drafted. A valid ballot paper must have an official stamp or perforation for it to be valid as per Borang 9 of the Conduct of Election Regulations.


    Posted on 28/01/2013 by MyOverseasVote
    Background

    MyOverseasVote has been campaigning since October 2010 for Malaysians residing outside Malaysia to be given the right to vote by post. In January 2013, the Election Commission (EC) announced that Malaysians residing overseas except in Singapore, southern Thailand (Narathiwat, Pattani, Yala, Songkhla and Satun), Kalimantan and Brunei would be allowed to apply to vote by post provided that they had been in Malaysia for at least 30 days in total during the previous five years.

    MyOverseasVote and Global Bersih do not accept that the additional restrictions imposed by the EC are constitutional, fair or necessary. We are displeased that it has taken nearly one and a half years since the EC Chairman announced in August 2011 that overseas postal voting would be allowed for these regulations to be announced to the public. Nevertheless we welcome the fact that many overseas Malaysians will be able to vote by post in the upcoming 13th General Election (GE13), and we will work with the EC and Wisma Putra to improve the overseas postal voting system in the run-up to GE13.

    Absent voters

    Prior to January 2013, only full-time students, government servants and members of the armed forces and their respective spouses living overseas were allowed to register as absent voters and thus be entitled to vote by post. Absent voters are in effect permanent postal voters, and will not be able to vote in person in Malaysia until such time as they re-register as ordinary voters. If you are a registered absent voter, you will be able to vote by post even if you reside in Singapore, southern Thailand, etc.

    Due to the closeness of the next general election, if you are not yet a registered absent voter, you should not register as an absent voter but should instead apply for a postal vote using Form 1B.

    How to apply for a postal vote

    Under the new EC scheme, overseas Malaysians who meet the qualifying criteria can apply to be postal voters for one general election. Please note that if you apply for a postal vote, you will not be able to vote in person in Malaysia.

    MyOverseasVote and Global Bersih encourage Malaysians to return to vote in Malaysia if you can afford to do so, but if you cannot afford to return to vote, then we encourage you to apply for a postal vote.

    In order to apply for a postal vote, you must first be a registered Malaysian voter. Any Malaysian citizen of or over the age of 21 can register at any computerised post office or Malaysian mission overseas (including embassies, consulates-general, high commissions, the Malaysian Friendship and Trade Centre in Taipei and the Malaysian Permanent Mission to the United Nations in Geneva). You only need to register once in your lifetime; however, it takes between 3-6 months after you register for a new electoral roll to be gazetted. To check whether you are already registered as a voter, please enter your IC no. at http://daftarj.spr.gov.my/. Students and government servants who have registered as absent voters will be listed with “pemilih tak hadir” as their locality, and do not need to apply using Form 1B.

    For those not listed as absent voters, you need to download Form 1B from the EC website at http://www.spr.gov.my/. You must fill in the form and return it to the EC by fax, post or email. Instructions for filling out the form, together with sample completed forms and Frequently Asked Questions, are available on the EC website.

    Your application for a postal vote must be received by the EC before Parliament or any State Legislative Assembly is dissolved.

    Collecting your postal ballot

    Overseas postal ballots are issued by the returning officer of each constituency in front of the political candidates’ agents, and are then sent by diplomatic pouch to the Malaysian mission overseas designated by the postal voter on his Form 1B. They must be collected and returned on the day notified by the mission in order for them to be returned to Malaysia by diplomatic pouch.

    To collect your postal ballot, you must come in person and bring your NRIC or passport with you.

    Please check with your local embassy, high commission or consulate closer to the day to find out what arrangements are in place for the collection of overseas postal ballots. If you collect your postal ballot on a different day from that which is promulgated, you will yourself be responsible for returning the postal ballot to the returning officer in Malaysia by 5 p.m. on polling day.

    Exercising your postal ballot

    If you apply to vote by post, you must collect your ballot paper in order to prevent it being used by another person.

    Voters from the States (except Sarawak, whose State elections are usually held separately) should receive two postal ballots for Federal and State elections, while voters from the Federal Territories and Sarawak should receive a Federal postal ballot only.

    To vote, you must check that the serial number on the ballot paper is the same as the number written on the Form 2 and the Envelope A, and then fill out and sign the declaration of identity (Form 2) in front of an embassy official or other Malaysian citizen.

    You should then mark your ballot paper in secret, and then seal it in the Envelope A. The Form 2 and Envelope A should then be sealed in the Envelope B and returned to the embassy staff.

    Minimising fraud

    MyOverseasVote and Global Bersih believe that the risk that your postal ballot will be tampered with after it has been used is minimal given the safeguards already in place under the 2003 Postal Voting Regulations, and that any attempted mass tampering should be detectable by the parties’ counting agents.

    (Admin: This is a very damning indictment on the EC's integrity that the public can have such worries about their impartiality.)

    We believe that the greater risk is that postal ballots will be issued improperly to phantom voters on the electoral roll or in the names of those known to be overseas who have not actually applied to vote by post, in order to dilute the votes of genuine overseas postal voters.
    For this reason, we believe that the risk of fraud is greater if overseas voters do not vote (thereby allowing others to apply to vote in their name), and strongly recommend that overseas Malaysians apply for a postal vote, and collect and exercise their postal votes on the designated day, if they cannot afford to return to Malaysia to vote.

    MyOverseasVote and Global Bersih call for all candidates to be given a list of postal voters in their constituencies at the end of nomination day, and for political parties to be given a nationwide list of overseas postal voters broken down by embassy, high commission or consulate.

    We also call upon the EC and Wisma Putra to permit party agents from each political party to observe the collection and voting process within each Malaysian mission overseas. If the EC and Wisma Putra refuse to allow this, then we overseas Malaysians will set up observation booths outside the missions in order to monitor the overseas postal vote collection ourselves.

    MyOverseasVote and Global Bersih are therefore calling for volunteers in all cities where Malaysian missions are located to be ready to observe the collection of postal ballots every day during the postal voting period. Observers will record the numbers of postal voters who turn up to collect postal ballots at every Malaysian mission, and will ask for and record postal voters’ IC numbers in order to determine the number of overseas postal votes cast in each constituency.

    We call on the EC urgently to begin formal discussions with political parties and with civil society to develop and agree to implement procedures that will underpin a transparent postal voting process that meets universal standards of accountability. Any refusal by the EC to engage with stakeholders on this issue can only be viewed as unwillingness on the part of the Commission to oversee the coming election process in an impartial and non-partisan manner.

    Conclusion

    MyOverseasVote, Bersih and Global Bersih will issue further statements on minimising fraud during the issuing and counting of postal ballots.

    For now, we encourage all eligible Malaysians to return Malaysia to vote if they can afford to and if not, to apply to vote by post as soon as possible.

    It is important that Malaysians overseas turn out in large numbers to vote, either in person or by post, in order to reduce the impact of any phantom voting.

    For more information follow us on http://www.facebook.com/MyOverseasVote or contact us on myoverseasvote@gmail.com.
    py

  4. #24
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    Overseas M'sians: Use postal votes to remove phantoms

    10:48AM Jan 29, 2013

    Two overseas organisations advocating electoral reform have called on Malaysians abroad to utilise the newly introduced facilities to cast their postal ballots in order to prevent their ballots from being abused by 'phantom voters'.

    MyOverseasVote (MOV), a group formed by Malaysians overseas to lobby for their voting rights in the next general election, and Global Bersih, an international support group for the clean and fair elections movement, Bersih, made the stance in a statement issued yesterday.

    After the Election Commission (EC)announced the criteria and procedures for Malaysians residing abroad to vote via post, many overseas Malaysians have, on the social media, expressed their reservations in taking part in the new process, citing potential ballot tampering during the process.

    However, both MOV and Global Bersih opined that the risks of the postal ballot being tampered with after it has been used is minimal, given the safeguards already in place under the 2003 Postal Voting Regulations, and that any attempted mass tampering should be detectable.

    "We believe that the greater risk is that postal ballots will be issued improperly to 'phantom voters' on the electoral roll, or in the names of those known to be overseas who have not actually applied to vote by post, in order to dilute the votes of genuine overseas postal voters.

    "For this reason, we believe that the risk of fraud is greater if overseas voters do not vote - thereby allowing others to apply to vote in their name - and we strongly recommend that overseas Malaysians apply for postal votes, and collect and exercise their postal votes on the designated day, if they cannot afford to return to Malaysia to vote," says the statement.

    "It is important that Malaysians overseas turn out in large numbers to vote, either in person or by post, in order to reduce the impacts of any phantom voting."

    To ensure the integrity of postal voting, both groups called for all candidates to be given a list of postal voters in their constituencies at the end of nomination day.

    They also demanded that political parties be given a nationwide list of overseas postal voters broken down by the local embassy, high commission or consulate.

    ‘If refused, we will monitor the collection ourselves'


    "We also call upon the EC and Wisma Putra (the Foreign Ministry) to permit party agents from each political party to observe the collection and voting process within each Malaysian mission overseas.

    "If the EC and Wisma Putra refuse to allow this, then we, overseas Malaysians, will set up observation booths outside the missions in order to monitor the overseas postal vote collection ourselves."

    Therefore, MOV and Global Bersih called for volunteers in all cities where Malaysian missions are located to be prepared to observe the collection of postal ballots every day during the postal voting period.

    "Observers will record the numbers of postal voters who turn up to collect postal ballots at every Malaysian mission, and will ask for, and record the postal voters' MyKad numbers in order to determine the number of overseas postal votes cast in each constituency."

    They urged the EC to immediately begin formal discussions with political parties and civil society to develop and agree to implement procedures that will underpin a transparent postal voting process that meets the universal standards of accountability.

    "Any refusal by the EC to engage with stakeholders on this issue can only be viewed as unwillingness on the part of the commission to oversee the coming election process in an impartial and non-partisan manner," the two groups added.

    Related stories

    EC: No demos post-election to avoid repeat of May 13

    py

  5. #25
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    For Election 2013, Malaysians plan trip across Causeway to vote



    January 30, 2013
    Some analysts have suggested that one reason the EC has imposed such strict conditions is because citizens abroad are likely to vote for the opposition. – File pic

    KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 30 — Barred from voting by post, a growing number of the estimated 400,000 Malaysians living in Singapore are planning to return home to cast their ballot in Election 2013, the Straits Times (ST) newspaper reported today.

    The Singapore daily reported more than 100 people have registered with a carpooling website, Balik Undi, run by the Singapore chapter of local polls reform group, Bersih, which aims to help Malaysians save on travel costs for that trip home during the 13th general elections that must be called by April.

    The website helps to match drivers and passengers who share similar destinations through an online form.

    Bersih Singapore coordinator Ong Guan Sin told ST that the group will be pushing the campaign hard after the Election Commission (EC) announced last week that Malaysians living and working in across the Causeway and in neighbouring southern Thailand, Brunei and Kalimantan in Borneo Indonesia would be excluded from a new regulation allowing Malaysians abroad to vote by post.

    The EC did not give any reason for the exclusion.

    Ong called the move “discrimination”, the paper reported.

    An estimated one million Malaysians live and work abroad and before the regulation was gazetted on Jan 21, only civil servants and full-time students as well as their spouses were allowed to vote by post as absentee voters.

    The election regulator also imposed extra conditions on overseas voters: that they must have been in Malaysia or returned to the country for 30 days in a period of five years before the dissolution of the current parliament or state legislative assembly.

    The Singapore paper reported that some analysts have suggested that one reason the EC has imposed such strict conditions is because citizens abroad are likely to vote for the opposition, although the pundits also said another plausible reason was that those who lived nearby could easily return to Malaysia to cast their ballots.

    A Malaysian in Singapore polled by the paper appeared to back the first suggestion.

    “I’ve never voted because I’m always overseas, but I feel the stakes are higher this time.

    “And the easiest way to make your voice heard is to put a tick in a box,” Malaysian photographer John Cheong told ST, which described the 48-year-old as a vote-virgin and self-confessed opposition supporter.

    Cheong told the paper he is voting in response to problems he felt were plaguing the country, such as corruption and abuse of power.

    But another, marketing executive Valerie Vincent, 26, told ST that not all Malaysians were going back to vote because they were upset with the government.

    “For me, it’s about experiencing the whole atmosphere of an election,” Vincent, who is from Selangor, told ST, adding that she plans to travel by bus with five or six Malaysian friends for the polls to her Selangor home state.

    The EC has reported some 500 Malaysians abroad have registered to be postal voters since the option was provided for the first time.
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  6. #26
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    1,574 Malaysians abroad register as postal voters


    February 06, 2013
    KOTA KINABALU, Feb 6 — To date, 1,574 Malaysians residing abroad have registered to vote, said Election Commission (EC) chairman Tan Sri Abdul Aziz Mohd Yusof.

    He said the highest number of Malaysians registered to vote were from Australia with 350, followed by the United Kingdom (25, United States (10, China (8 and Qatar (86) since online registration was launched on December 21, last year.

    “The decision by the EC to enable all Malaysians overseas not including government servants and students to register via online, fax and email has been effective.

    “About 100 Malaysians residing overseas are registering with the EC daily and we hope the trend will continue. At the moment, the EC has not received any protests or complaints from Malaysians abroad on the registration process.”

    He said this after handing out appointment letters to three non-governmental organisations (NGO) as local observers in the coming 13th general election for Sabah and Labuan here, today.

    The three NGOs are the Sabah branch of the Malaysian Historical Society, Sabah Youth Council and the Federation of Chinese Associations Sabah.

    Abdul Aziz (picture) said among the conditions for Malaysians abroad to vote were that they must register as voters earlier and return to the country for at least 30 days in the last five years before Parliament is dissolved.

    “Our conditions are reasonable as we do not want them to break the cultural, family and Malaysian ties when abroad.

    “The conditions are similar to those imposed in other countries,” he said.

    Malaysians abroad who have registered as voters and wish to vote by post can download the application form (1B Form) through the EC website at http://www.spr.gov.my.
    To avoid abuse, Abdul Aziz said the balloting process overseas could be witnessed by party agents.

    “The parties can appoint anybody as their agent there. However, the ballot papers can only be opened in front of the candidate’s agent in Malaysia,” he said.
    Before this, only overseas students and government employees and their spouses were eligible to vote as overseas voters. — Bernama
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  7. #27
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    2,485 Malaysian abroad apply to become postal vosters


    February 16, 2013
    PETALING JAYA, Feb 16 — The Election Commission (EC) has received 2,485 applications from Malaysians abroad wishing to vote by post in 13th general election
    .

    Deputy Chairman Datuk Wan Ahmad Wan Omar said most are Malaysians in Australia (574), followed by United Kingdom (449), United States (195), China (132) and Qatar (116).

    “The closing date for registration of overseas postal voters is when parliament is dissolved. I advise them to register early and not at the last minute to avoid problems,” he told a press conference here today.

    Voters who wish to apply need to download the 1B form from the EC website www.spr.gov.my and send back the completed form via email, fax or mail.

    Rules allowing Malaysians abroad to vote by post was gazetted on January 21 based on three conditions.

    They must be registered voters, return to Malaysia at least 30 days in five years before the dissolution of parliament and state assemblies and applicable to Malaysians abroad except those in South Thailand, Singapore, Brunei and Kalimantan.

    Wan Ahmad said the applications will be processed and approved by the retaining officer in the polling area. Postal voters will vote in the Malaysian embassy or high commission.

    “We will not send ballot papers to postal voters address as we want to ensure that they receive them to guarantee their right to vote is preserved.”

    He dismissed claims of a non-governmental organisation (NGO) that the postal voting for overseas voters would take about a month to implement.

    “It’s hard to say the exact number of days but we take swift action to ensure that the ballot papers reach voters and get back to the EC quickly. In fact, voting is only for one day.” — Bernama
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  8. #28
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    Political parties allowed to appoint agents to monitor postal voting at Malaysian embassies: EC


    MARCH 16, 2013
    SHAH ALAM, March 16 – All political parties will be allowed to appoint representatives or agents to monitor the handing over of ballot papers by postal voters abroad for the coming 13th general election, Election Commission (EC) deputy chairman Datuk Wan Ahmad Wan Omar said today.


    He said political parties intending to do so were required to send the names of their representatives or agents to the EC which would then send the list to the Malaysian embassies abroad.


    “The process of handing over the ballot papers which is done at the handing over centres at the Malaysian embassies abroad can be monitored by appointed observers.


    “Only bearers of names which have been registered are allowed to observe the process.


    “They will be issued with a pass that will have their name and the party they represent,” he told reporters after a briefing for local observers in the coming 13th general election here.


    Wan Ahmad said each political party would be allowed to appoint at least 10 representatives who should be Malaysians aged 21 and above.


    Only one representative can monitor the process at one time because the space where the process is going to be held is limited.


    “They can take turn because the process is going to take a long time,” he added.


    He said the decision to allow political parties to appoint representatives to monitor the process was made because it would be the first time that Malaysian registered voters residing overseas would be allowed to vote through post.


    The EC, in an effort to improve its services, had also appointed non-governmental organisations (NGO) to be observers in the coming general election, he added.


    He said the EC had appointed five NGOs, namely, the Merdeka Centre, Institute For Democracy and Economic Affairs, Malaysia Youth Council, Malaysian Confederation of the Disabled and the Centre For Public Policy Study.


    This way, it could give a message to the people that the election process in the country is transparent and according to the law, he added. – Bernama
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  9. #29
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    He is obviously ignorant of his own procedures. It does not matter whether there is a technical problem on the website (in downloading forms) at the last minute or not.

    Registration of Elections Regulation 9: For the purpose of a general election or a by-election, the Election Commission shall determine the last certified principal electoral roll and the supplementary electoral roll,
    prior to the dissolution of Parliament or a State Legislative Assembly or a vacancy occurring, to be used in the general election or the by-election.


    EC seeking legal advice on extension of deadline




    The Election Commission (EC) is seeking legal advice on whether the deadline for Malaysian expatriates to register as postal voters can be extended, EC chief Abdul Aziz Mohd Yusof said today.

    This is in view of numerous technical problems faced by voters trying to register themselves through the EC website.

    “I have been made to understand that there are too many Borang 1B being submitted at the very last minute,” Aziz told Malaysiakini via SMS when asked.

    He said he would seek the advice of the commission’s legal adviser before making a decision on the matter.

    Borang 1B is the form used for voter registration by Malaysians residing abroad. The closing date had been fixed as midnight after the dissolution of Parliament.

    Swarms of Malaysians residing abroad have been trying to download the form from the EC website soon after the parliament was dissolved about noon on April 3.

    This caused the website to be inaccessible and many netizens were fuming that they had missed the deadline as a result.

    A check at 2pm today showed a lightweight version of the website running, along with the notice saying, “EC’s website is currently under maintenance”.

    Meanwhile, Australia-based Malaysian Lim Hoong Huei toldMalaysiakini that although he managed to access the website, he could not submit his registration form.

    Recounting several failed attempts to register himself as a postal voter due to changing rules, Lim said, “Now, I was told to use the link and register myself. I did but when I submitted it, it bounced back.

    “I’m not sure if the server is not accepting it or any other issue. I have a friend in Sydney who was testing that and experiencing the same issue as well, so after a few attempts we just gave up.”


    Lim said it would only be fair if the EC extended the deadline, and he would not consider flying back to Malaysia to vote because the airfare would be too costly.

    Related stories

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    Guan Eng dissolves assembly on 'auspicious day'

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